2019 Annual Conference

4 – 6 April 2019
Brighton

The Association for Art History’s Annual Conference presents current, international research and critical debate around art,  art history and visual culture.

Taking place over 3 days, the Annual Conference is an opportunity to engage with new research, hear leading keynotes, broaden networks and exchange ideas. It attracts over 500 international delegates, speakers and publishers each year. Members of the Association for Art History get discount conference rates.

About

The (expanded) field provides […] for an organisation of work that is not dictated by the conditions of a particular medium. Rosalind Krauss, ‘Sculpture in the Expanded Field’, 1979.

The Association for Art History’s 2019 Annual Conference in Brighton will explore how art history and visual culture are manifest in the everyday, as well as in scholarly and curatorial life. What is art history and visual culture in an expanded field?

The conference will host sessions that think in expanded ways about the materials of art history and visual culture, and the diverse sites and circumstances of its production and circulation. Some connect art histories with pressing topics in humanities, such as the role of migration and its legacies in global histories, and the relation between image and planet. Other sessions encourage reflections on how our activities as writers, educators and theorists enrich and stimulate our professional practices.

There will also be a programme of parallel events, including talks, workshops, visits and screenings. We hope that this conference will provoke and share encounters with art histories and visual cultures in new, diverse dimensions. A full list of sessions and papers are now available to view and/or download.

The 2019 Annual Conference is co-organised and convened by:
Association for Art History – Claire Davies and Cheryl Platt
University of Brighton – Lara Perry, Jeremy Aynsley, Annebella Pollen, Louise Purbrick, Claire Wintle, Matthew Cornford, Naomi Salaman and Ceren Ozpinar
University of Sussex – Francesco Ventrella

Sessions

Vitalist Modernism Visual Solidarities: Crossing borders in aesthetic practices Urban Dislocations and the Architecture of Diasporas (1900 – present) Uneasy Queer Art Histories The Non-Medium Specificity of ‘Graphicality’ The Artist Interview: An interdisciplinary approach to its history, process and dissemination Survey Style: Landscape photography across the globe Stranger Things: Locating design in science fiction and fantasy films Slowness and Suffering: Critical approaches to temporalities of violence Sexuality in the Field of Encounter: The aesthetic topographies of eros Rereading Photography Theory of the Eighties Recovering the Ritual Object in Medieval and Early Modern Art Public Sculpture in the Expanded Field Pedagogy and Practice in the Long 1960s Occult Performances and Reflections: The everyday occult in visual culture Notate, Document, Score: Body culture & visual culture Modern(ist) Objects? The ‘objet trouvé’ in the 18th and 19th centuries Landscapes of the Everyday Keeping Painting in its Place: The refusal of the expanded field Art Historiography in the Expanded Field Fugitive Visions: Art and the Eidetic Image From Casting to Coding: Technologies of sculptural reproduction from antiquity to the present ‘Fiction with footnotes’: Writing art history as literary practice Expanding the Ceramic Field in the Long 19th Century Dress and Dissent: Embodying protest ‘Difficult Heritage’ and the Legacies of Empire. Diversifying engagement with material culture in public spaces and museums Diaspora Artists and British Art History: Intervention–integration–expansion Workshop: Decolonising the Curriculum: Creative and practical strategies Danger! Women Reading Culture, Capital, Collaboration: Towards a new educational exchange Critical Pedagogies in the Neoliberal University: Expanding the feminist field in the 21st-century art school Conceptual Cartography: Spatial representations in conceptual art Building a Planetary Imaginary: Information design, contemporary art, and environmental politics Blood in Modern and Contemporary Art Artistry in the Spaces of Medicine Art Education: The making of alternatives? Art and Xerox Art and Gentrification in the Changing Neoliberal Urban Landscape Art after 1945: At home or homeless? Affective Fashion(s)

TICKETS & BOOKING

Early Bird Tickets (booking before 1 March 2019)
book tickets online via Eventbrite

£300   Early full conf (3 days)

£200   Member early full conf (3 days)

£130   Early Student/Concession full conf (3 days)

£100   Member early student/concession full conf ( 1 – 3 days)

£180   Early day delegate (1 day)

£150   Member early day delegate (1 day)

Free bursary tickets for Doctoral and Early Career Researchers (see below)


Standard Tickets
(booking after 1 March 2019)

£380   Standard full conf (3 days)

£255   Member standard full conf (3 days)

£190   Standard student/concession full conf (3 days)

£155   Member standard student/concession full conf (1 -3 days)

£240   Standard day delegate (1 day)

£220   Member standard day delegate (1 day)

For the 2019 Annual Conference we’ve made available 30 bursary tickets for Doctoral and Early Career Researchers. Applications for bursary tickets must be made before 25 January 2019. Find out how to apply.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Claire Bishop, Professor in the art history department at CUNY Graduate Center, New York

Marcia Pointon, Professor Emerita in History of Art, University of Manchester

Michael Rakowitz, Iraqi American artist and Associate Professor at Northwestern University

PROGRAMME

Below is a summary of the conference programme, including which sessions are taking place on what days. Selected sessions, roundtables and workshops will also be accessible to the public as well as delegates, as part of the conferences’ public programme.

PDF conference programme summary

THURSDAY 4 APRIL

9.30 – 17.00 REGISTRATION & REFRESHMENTS

10.30 – 15.30 RESEARCH PANELS & PAPERS

• Art & Gentification in the Changing Neoliberal Urban Landscape
• Art Education: The making of alternatives?
• Artistry in the Spaces of Medicine
• Danger! Women Reading
• ‘Difficult Heritage’ and the Legacies of Empire: Diversifying engagement with material culture in public places and museums
• Dress and Dissent: Embodying protest
• From Casting to Coding: Technologies of sculptural reproduction from antiquity to the present
• Fugitive Visions: Art and the Eidetic Image
• Public Sculpture in the Expanded Field
• Recovering the Ritual Object in Medieval and Early Modern Art
• Urban Dislocations and the Architecture of Diasporas (1900 – present)

10.30 – 17.00 ROUNDTABLE: CULTURE, CAPITAL, COLLABORATION
This roundtable discussion, organised by the Association for Art History, will be open to the public as well as delegates.

12.30 – 13.30 LUNCH

15.30 – 16.00 REFRESHMENTS

16.00 – 17.30 WORKSHOP: Art and Government Equality Policies
This workshop will be open to the public as well as delegates.

17.45 – 19.00 KEYNOTE LECTURE
Michael Rakowitz, Iraqi American artist and Associate Professor at Northwestern University

19.00 – 20.00 DRINKS RECEPTION
Brighton Museum & Art Gallery

FRIDAY 5 APRIL

8.30 – 17.30 REGISTRATION & REFRESHMENTS

9.20 – 12.30 RESEARCH PANELS & PAPERS

• Art & Xerox
• Building a Planetary Imaginary: Information design, contemporary art and environmental politics
• Conceptual Cartography: Spatial representations in Conceptual Art
• Diaspora Artists and British Art History: Intervention-integration-expansion
• Expanding the Ceramic Field in the Long 19th Century
• Notate, Document, Score: Body culture & visual culture
• Rereading Photography Theory of the Eighties
• Survey Style: Landscape photography across the globe
• Vitalist Modernism

9.20 – 12.30 WORKSHOP: DECOLONISING THE CURRICULUM
This workshop about Decolonizing the Curriculum: Creative and practical strategies, will be open to the public as well as delegates.

10.45 – 11.15 REFRESHMENTS

12.30 – 14.30 LUNCHTIME & LUNCHTIME ACTIVITIES

12.45 – 14.15 ROYAL PAVILION TOUR
Royal Pavilion Tour (booking required – see visits/tours on the website)

13.15 – 14.15 REF DISCUSSION
REF Discussion

14.30 – 17.50 RESEARCH PANELS & PAPERS

• Blood in Modern and Contemporary Art
• Conceptual Cartography: Spatial representations in Conceptual Art
• ‘Fiction with footnotes’: Writing art history as literary practice
• Modern(ist) Objects? The Object Trouvé in 18th and 19th centuries
• Pedagogy and Practice in the Long 1960s
• Sexuality in the Field of Encounter: The aesthetic topographies of eros
• Slowness and Suffering: Critical approaches to temporalities of violence
• Stranger Things: Locating design in science fiction and fantasy films
• The Non-Medium Specificity of ‘Graphicality’
• Visual Solidarities: Crossing borders in aesthetic practices
• Vitalist Modernism

14.30 – 16.30 PUBLIC SCULPTURE & MONUMENT WALK
Sculpture and Monument Walk around Brighton

15.55 – 16.25 REFRESHMENTS

18.15 – 19.00 KEYNOTE LECTURE
Claire Bishop, Professor in the art history department at CUNY Graduate Center, New York

19.15 – 20.15 DRINKS RECEPTION
The Royal Pavilion

SATURDAY 6 APRIL

08.30 – 13.00 REGISTRATION & REFRESHMENTS

09.35 – 15.55 RESEARCH PANELS & PAPERS

• Affective Fashion(s)
• Art after 1945: At home or homeless?
• Art Historiography in the Expanded Field
• Critical Pedagogies in the Neoliberal University: Expanding the feminist field in the 21st-century art school
• Keeping Painting in its Place: The refusal of the expanded field
• Landscapes of the Everyday
• Occult Performances and Reflections: The everyday occult in visual culture
• The Artist Interview: An interdisciplinary approach to its history, process and dissemination
• Uneasy Queer Art Histories

10.00 – 11.30 ROUNDTABLE: CHANGING ATTITUDES IN WESTERN ART MUSEUMS
This roundtable will discuss ‘Importing Representative Art Historical Narratives: A case for changing attitudes in Western art museums’. It will be open to the public as well as delegates.

11.30 – 12.00 REFRESHMENTS

12.00 – 12.15 AWARDS & PRIZES

12.15 – 13.00 KEYNOTE LECTURE
Marcia Pointon, Professor Emerita in History of Art, University of Manchester

13.00 – 14.00 LUNCH

16.00 – 17.00 REFRESHMENTS, NETWORKING & FILM SCREENINGS

17.00 – 19.00 ART HISTORY IN EDUCATION MANIFESTO LAUNCH & DRINKS RECEPTION
This will be open to the public as well as delegates.

There will be a range of exhibitors and publishers present at the conference, as well as exhibitions and screenings. Tours and visits will also take place over the three days.

VISITS & TOURS

Delegates can book to attend visits and tours taking place over the three days.

THURSDAY 4 APRIL

RADICAL HISTORIES WALK
THURSDAY 4 APRIL
16.00 – 17.30
TBC
pre-book your tour visit ticket

FRIDAY 5 APRIL

THE ROYAL PAVILION
FRIDAY 5 APRIL
12.45 – 14.15
This unique tour of the Royal Pavilion will be led by curator and art historian Alexandra Loske (University of Brighton). Alexandra will show delegates the State Rooms, the Great Kitchen and the King’s Apartments of George IV’s pleasure palace by the sea. The tour will provide insights into the recent major restoration project of the Saloon, as well as a large loans project scheduled for 2019. Tours are open to all delegates, but you must pre-book as numbers are limited.
Max number of people: 20
£14.00
pre-book your tour visit ticket

PUBLIC SCULPTURE WALK
FRIDAY 5 APRIL
14.30 – 16.30
This walking tour offers delegates a chance to see a selection of public sculptures and monuments in Brighton. It will include examples of public sculpture and monuments from the Regency period to the present day. The tour will uncover neglected aspects of these often ‘taken for granted’ features of the urban landscape. The tour will highlight the local and national histories behind these objects their opening ceremonies, changes of location, aspects of public art commissioning, their popular reception and the peculiarities of the Brighton seaside experience.
The tour will be taken on foot on pavements and roads, avoiding steps, stairs and steep inclines. It will last approximately two hours much of it along the seafront promenade. In the event of inclement weather, a short talk and trail leaflet will be presented at Grand Parade instead.
Peter and Jill Seddon are retired academics from the Schools of Art and Humanities, University of Brighton and are co-authors, together with Anthony McIintosh, of ‘The Public Sculptures of Sussex’, (Liverpool University Press, 2014).Tours are open to all delegates, but you must pre-book as numbers are limited.
Max number of people: 12
£5.00 (donation to a Brighton homeless charity)
pre-book your tour visit ticket

SATURDAY 6 APRIL

FIRLE PLACE (TBC)
SATURDAY 6 APRIL

CONTEMPORARY ART WALK (TBC)
SATURDAY 6 APRIL

EXHIBITORS

The following publishers and exhibitors will be attending the 2019 Annual Conference:

Bloomsbury
Brepols
Burlington Magazine
Intellect
MUP
MIT Press
Paul Mellon Centre
Penn State University Press
Photoworks
Princeton University Press
Routledge
Wiley
Yale University Press

Unfortunately we have now sold out of exhibitor tables. However, if you would like a presence at the Annual Conference, you can include catalogues, leaflets and flyers in our delegate packs.

ADVERTISING & INSERTS

Every delegate will receive a conference programme and delegate bag. To make a booking, please download the form below.

Conference Programme Adverts: Booking deadline 25 January 2019
• Half page (A5 landscape) £260 +VAT
• Quarter page £160+VAT
SOLD OUT

Inserts for delegate bags: Booking deadline 15 March 2019
(quantity 500):
• Up to single A4 sheet £210 +VAT
• Booklet/Catalogue A4 £310 +VAT

Click here to download a Booking Form

Accommodation & Delegate Information

Registration

Registration will take place in the Grand Parade Building on the Grand Parade Campus at the University of Brighton, 58–67 Grand Parade, BN2 0JY. All pre-booked delegates will need to register on arrival to pick up a badge, programme and pack.

Registration times:

Thursday 4 April 09.30 – 17.00
Friday 5 April 08.30 – 17.30
Saturday 6 April 08.30 – 13.00

Minimal luggage may be left at Registration, Thurs 09.30 – 17.30, Fri 8.30 – 17.30, Sat 8.30 – 16.00.

Sessions and Keynotes
Sessions will take place in the following buildigns: Grand Parade, Edward Street and Dorset Place. Campus map.

Accommodation
Conference delegates must book and pay for their own accommodation. We recommend doing so as soon as possible as Brighton is popular and hotels book up quickly. We’ve work with VisitBrighton to make this as quick and easy as possible for delegates.

Special accommodation rates for delegates until 26 March 2019

VisitBrighton is the official accommodation booking provider for delegates and offer specially negotiated rates for delegates. The website will show you a range of accommodation options for the conference dates you require. VisitBrighton will be open for bookings until 26th March 2019 but we advise early booking in order to guarantee your preferred hotel. Through this website you can book, modify or cancel your hotel reservations at any time.

Other accommodation booking sites:
www.booking.com
www.trivago.co.uk
www.hotels.com
www.hostelworld.com
www.expedia.co.uk
www.bedandbreakfast.com
www.tripadvisor.co.uk

Food

Tea and coffee will be available during the morning and afternoon breaks on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. There are plenty of places to get lunch nearby. Delegates should arrange their own evening meals and are encouraged to book tables.

Travel

Situated in the county of East Sussex along the south-east of England, Brighton is 90 km from London. Travel links are excellent. The M25/M23 motorway link provides easy road access to London and the rest of the country, while mainland Europe is a short journey by air, train or ship from various departure points.

By Plane
Gatwick international airport is half an hour by road and rail from Brighton. The M23 connects Gatwick to Brighton and the London-Brighton rail link passes through the airport, which has its own station.
Heathrow international airport is on the M25 which connects with the M23 at junction 7. There is a direct coach link to Gatwick or you can take the underground from Heathrow to London Victoria.

By Car
The Grand Parade site is in Brighton city centre. The site is easily accessible on foot, bike and public transport. Car parking in the area is limited.

From London: the M25/M23 link provides road access from London and the rest of the country.
From east and west: the A27 and the A259 provide access to Brighton. The A259 runs along Brighton seafront.

From the A23 or A27: Follow signs for the city centre and seafront. As you enter the city, a one-way system will lead you towards the sea via Grand Parade. The university’s Grand Parade building is on the left, almost opposite the Royal Pavilion. Due to the site’s central location, car parking is extremely limited. There are a number of signposted NCP car parks located nearby.

Parking
Due to the site’s central location, car parking is extremely limited. There are a number of signposted NCP car parks located nearby at NCP Brighton Theatre and NCP Brighton Centre Russell Road.

By Train
National Rail Enquiries for train times and bookings. Please note, that there are planned engineering works on the Brighton mainline scheduled for Saturday 6 and Sunday 7 April (this will also effect trains to and from Gatwick). Check the timetables for these dates as it’s anticipated that travel will take longer.

Train journey times
• Brighton to London Victoria: 55 minutes
• Brighton to London Gatwick Airport: 30 minutes
• Brighton to Eastbourne: 35 minutes
• Brighton to Hastings: 1 hour
From Brighton railway station: the entrance to Trafalgar Street is on the right-hand side of the station as you leave and it runs under the station entrance area and down the hill. Follow it to the bottom of the hill and then turn right onto Grand Parade. Cross to the other side of Grand Parade and keep walking towards the sea. The university’s Grand Parade building is on the left, opposite Victoria Gardens before you get to the Royal Pavilion.

By Bus
Grand Parade’s central location places it at the heart of the Brighton and Hove bus network and makes it easy to reach the site from any area of the city.
Visit the Brighton and Hove Bus Company website for timetables.

 

By Coach
National Express coaches depart for Brighton from London Victoria coach station 18 times a day.
Megabus coaches depart for Brighton from London Gatwick and London Heathrow airports several times a day.

By Bike
The city centre cycle lane network provides easy access to the Grand Parade site. Cycle stands are provided at the rear of the Grand Parade, off William Street. There is a cycle cage in front of the Circus Street Annexe, accessed via Kingswood Street.

AV and Printing

All session rooms will include an overhead projector with screen. Sound and internet will be available in all session rooms. WiFi will be available via the Cloud and Eduroam.
Speakers should bring their presentation on either a USB drive and use Powerpoint or equivalent (and a printed copy if necessary). Additional technical requirements must be confirmed with the Conference Coordinator by 10 March 2019. We cannot guarantee access to a printer or photocopier on site.

Other Useful Information & FAQs

Conference proceedings may be photographed and filmed for media use by the Association for Art History, University of Brighton, but you will be able to opt out of photographs should you wish. You can find out how we collect and use your data via our terms and conditions page.
You can find more FAQs, including cancellation policies, on the Eventbrite page.